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Would-be moms, beware: Smoking e-cigarettes during pregnancy could cause birth defects

Smoking e-cigarettes during pregnancy could cause facial defects in the babies, a study warns. The findings suggested that e-cigarettes pose health risks despite being widely considered a safer alternative to tobacco cigarettes. Researchers exposed frog embryos and samples of mammalian neural crest cells to saline infused with e-cigarette vapour. Frogs, like other vertebrates, are similar to humans embryonically, said Amanda Dickinson, from the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in the US. “This means that if a chemical perturbs a frog embryo, it’s likely to do the same thing to a human…

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Marmite could prevent miscarriages and birth defects, study shows

Love it or hate it, it turns out that marmite is actually pretty good for our health. Earlier this year we reported that the salty breakfast staple has been shown to boost brain function, and now it seems that it may also be beneficial for pregnant women and their unborn babies, too. A 12-year Australian study has concluded that marmite can reduce the risk of miscarriage and birth defects, as the high levels of vitamin B3 it contains work to treat molecular deficiencies in pregnant women. The research Scientists used genetic sequencing on…

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Antibiotics may up birth defects in newborns

Beware would-be-mothers as a study has recently found that certain antibiotics during pregnancy may increase risk of major birth defects in your newborn. The findings indicated that amoxicillin, cephalosporins and nitrofurantoin were not associated with birth defects. Although the absolute risks for birth defects were small, physicians should consider prescribing other antibiotics when treating patients with infections during pregnancy. Senior author Anick Berard said that infections during pregnancy are frequent and should be treated. Berard added that the study highlights safer options for treatment of infections, more specifically urinary tract infections or…

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Epilepsy drugs may increase birth defect risk

Exposure to certain anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy may put women at higher risk of having a child with a malformation, or birth defect, says a study. The study based on systematic review of 50 published studies found that exposure in the womb to the anti-epileptic drug sodium valproate was associated with a 10 per cent chance of the child having a significant birth defect and this rose as the dose of the drug increased. The types of birth defect that were increased were skeletal and limb defects, cardiac defects,…

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Babies Born With Low Birth Weight May Be Less Active Later in Life

Babies born with a low birth weight are less likely to be good at sports at school, or to engage in exercise later in life, according to a recent study. The findings showed that those with a low birth weight were less likely to take part in exercise and sports across adulthood, from 36 to 68 years. Although previous studies have shown that a low birth weight can affect sporting ability and exercise levels at a younger age, however, this is the first study that has revealed how low birth relates…

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Weight Gain During Pregnancy May Lead To Preterm Birth

Abnormalities in interval between pregnancies, mother’s body mass index (BMI) prior to pregnancy and the amount of weight gain in pregnancy can lead to preterm birth, a new study has found. The study, published in the journal Maternal and Child Health Journal, showed that if these factors were modified, it could reduce the risk of premature births. “The highest risks for premature birth were in women who were underweight, had poor weight gain during pregnancy, or short periods of time between pregnancies. Excessive weight gain in obese women also increased…

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