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Are you at risk? Absence of this gene can give men a deadly cancer

A study has recently revealed that men who lack a certain gene subtype may be more susceptible to treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Researchers from Cleveland Clinic confirmed for the first time a mechanistic link between the gene HSD17B4 and deadly, aggressive prostate cancer. The team built upon their earlier seminal work in which they discovered that a gene called HSD3B1, when altered, enables prostate tumors to evade treatment and proliferate. They went on to show that the presence of this gene variant does in fact change treatment outcomes and overall survival…

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This unusual use of blueberry extract in boosting cancer therapy will surprise you

Cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix – the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina. Researchers from the University Of Missouri-Columbia, United States explained that one of the most common treatments for cervical cancer is radiation therapy and that it not only destroys the cancer cells, but also the nearby healthy cells, which proves to be a hazard. “For some cancers, such as late-stage cervical cancer, radiation is a good treatment option. However, collateral damage to healthy cells…

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Want to avoid risk of bowel cancer? Cut processed red meat, alcohol from your diet

Are you a meat lover? We have some important news for you. According to a new study, a group of researchers have found strong evidence of links between lifestyle and colorectal cancer risk. Physical activity and whole grains lowers risk of this cancer; too much alcohol and red meat, processed meats and obesity increase the risk. Eating whole grains daily, such as brown rice or whole-wheat bread, reduces colorectal cancer risk, with the more you eat the lower the risk and there was strong evidence that physical activity protects against colon cancer. Edward…

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Kick the butt: Smoking changes lung cells, readies them for cancer

Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke can change lung cells over time, making them more vulnerable to disease and priming them to develop cancer, say US researchers. The report in the journal Cancer Cell is based on lab experiments on lung cells that were exposed to chronic cigarette smoke – the equivalent of a person smoking for 20 to 30 years. After about 10 days, the cells began to change their gene expression, a process known as epigenetic change. It took 10 months before these changes built up enough to boost…

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Do you use aspirin regularly? It might make colon cancer harder to treat

Daily aspirin use — known to reduce the risk of colon cancer — could also make the disease harder to treat if it does occur, say researchers. The new findings based on mathematical modelling, if confirmed statistically and in the lab, would mean that the aspirin’s ability to ward off colon cancer may come at an unacceptably high cost. Taking aspirin regularly “has been shown to reduce the incidence (of) a variety of cancers,” including of the colon, noted the authors of a study in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface….

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Study establishes link between sedentary lifestyle and kidney, bladder cancer risk

A new study led by researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute establishes a connection between a sedentary lifestyle and risk of developing kidney or bladder cancer. The findings extend a line of inquiry that has already revealed a connection between chronic inactivity and heightened risk for both ovarian and cervical cancer, and also highlight the possibility of reducing risk for some cancers by increasing physical activity. The new research, published online ahead of print in the journal Cancer Epidemiology,details the findings of a hospital-based case-control study involving 160 patients with…

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