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Want to avoid risk of bowel cancer? Cut processed red meat, alcohol from your diet

Are you a meat lover? We have some important news for you. According to a new study, a group of researchers have found strong evidence of links between lifestyle and colorectal cancer risk. Physical activity and whole grains lowers risk of this cancer; too much alcohol and red meat, processed meats and obesity increase the risk. Eating whole grains daily, such as brown rice or whole-wheat bread, reduces colorectal cancer risk, with the more you eat the lower the risk and there was strong evidence that physical activity protects against colon cancer. Edward…

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Kick the butt: Smoking changes lung cells, readies them for cancer

Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke can change lung cells over time, making them more vulnerable to disease and priming them to develop cancer, say US researchers. The report in the journal Cancer Cell is based on lab experiments on lung cells that were exposed to chronic cigarette smoke – the equivalent of a person smoking for 20 to 30 years. After about 10 days, the cells began to change their gene expression, a process known as epigenetic change. It took 10 months before these changes built up enough to boost…

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Do you use aspirin regularly? It might make colon cancer harder to treat

Daily aspirin use — known to reduce the risk of colon cancer — could also make the disease harder to treat if it does occur, say researchers. The new findings based on mathematical modelling, if confirmed statistically and in the lab, would mean that the aspirin’s ability to ward off colon cancer may come at an unacceptably high cost. Taking aspirin regularly “has been shown to reduce the incidence (of) a variety of cancers,” including of the colon, noted the authors of a study in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface….

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Study establishes link between sedentary lifestyle and kidney, bladder cancer risk

A new study led by researchers at Roswell Park Cancer Institute establishes a connection between a sedentary lifestyle and risk of developing kidney or bladder cancer. The findings extend a line of inquiry that has already revealed a connection between chronic inactivity and heightened risk for both ovarian and cervical cancer, and also highlight the possibility of reducing risk for some cancers by increasing physical activity. The new research, published online ahead of print in the journal Cancer Epidemiology,details the findings of a hospital-based case-control study involving 160 patients with…

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3-D Printed Ovaries Can Help Restore Fertility in Female Cancer Survivors

In its one-of-a-kind discovery, experts at the Northwestern University in America were able to successfully implant 3-dimensional ovaries in female mice. These bioprosthetic ovaries housed immature eggs and were able to produce healthy offspring in mice. “Using bioengineering, instead of transplanting from a cadaver – to create organ structures that function and restore the health of that tissue for that person – is the holy grail of bioengineering for regenerative medicine,” noted Teresa K Woodruff, from Northwestern’s Women’s Health Research Institute in the US.   The team created biological hydrogel…

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Breast Milk Can be a Marker in Detecting Breast Cancer

How can a woman know if she is at a risk of breast cancer? In most cases, what a woman is usually advised is to self-examine her breasts regularly or get them clinically examined by a medical professional. Young women may go for an ultrasound, whereas mammography is advised only for women above 35 years of age. Objective detection of breast cancer in young women in the early stages is challenging as young females have dense breast tissue. These are often not effectively screened by mammography and imaging techniques. A…

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