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Regular Meditation May Reduce Risk of Memory Loss in Elderly

A new study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, shows that older adults who practice meditation regularly may have improved memory functions and better objective cognitive performance  than those who don’t. Moreover, these two functions are also key risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that destroys your memory and also affects your thinking and behavioral skills. Researchers from West Virginia University in the United States found out that in older adults with subjective cognitive decline, a condition that may represent a preclinical stage of Alzheimer’s disease, practicing…

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Low Protein Levels May Increase Kidney Function Decline in Elderly

Older adults with low blood levels of a circulating protein in the blood may be at an increased risk of experiencing decline in their kidney function, a study has found. The findings showed that higher blood levels of a protein called soluble klotho — with anti-ageing properties — may help preserve kidney function. “We found a strong association between low soluble klotho and decline in kidney function, independent of many known risk factors for kidney function decline,” said David Drew from Tufts University in Massachusetts, US. The kidney has the…

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Exercise May Boost Memory, Brain Activity in Elderly

To increase brain function and boost memory in older adults, it is important to maintain high levels of fitness through physical activity such as walking, jogging, swimming, or dancing. Brain function and memory are the hallmark impairments in Alzheimer’s disease. According to this study, the age-related changes in memory performance and brain activity largely depend on an individual’s fitness level. Older adults who exercised showed good cardiac fitness levels which improved their memory performance and increased brain activity patterns compared to their low fit peers. “Therefore, starting an exercise programme,…

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An Hour-Long Nap May Boost Memory, Thinking In Elderly

An hour-long nap after lunch may help older adults to preserve their memories, improve their ability to think clearly as well as to make decisions, a study has found. Sleep plays a key role in helping older adults maintain their healthy mental function, necessary for people as they age, the researchers said. In the study, led by Junxin Li from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, the team examined nearly 3,000 Chinese adults aged 65 and older to learn whether taking an afternoon nap had any effect on their mental health….

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Vitamin D Deficiency May Up Chronic Headache Risk In Elderly Men

Deficiency in the levels of Vitamin D may increase the risk of chronic headache in middle-aged and older men, according to a new study. The findings showed that individuals with the lowest vitamin D levels had over a two-fold risk of chronic headache in comparison to the those with the highest levels. Vitamin D deficiency has also been associated with chronic tension-type headache, perhaps by causing musculoskeletal pain. Previous studies have found Vitamin D to play a role in various neurovascular diseases. The study adds to the accumulating body of…

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Female doctors better at treating elderly, finds Harvard study

Female doctors are better than male doctors in treating elderly patients in hospitals, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard University. They found that chances of patients dying or getting readmitted in the next 30 days went down if the doctors were women. It is the first time that a study has documented how male and female physicians’ treatment leads to different outcomes for patients in the U.S. The researchers estimated that if male physicians could achieve the same outcomes as their female colleagues, there would be…

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