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This May Be the Reason Why Alzheimer’s Patients Lose their Memory

Alzheimer’s, a type of dementia, is a progressive disease that affects a person’s memory and other important functions which are destroyed over time. It usually affects people over the age of 65 and memory loss is one of the most characteristic symptoms of the disease. But do you know why? A new study, published in the journal Neurology, reveals the reason. According to researchers, an alteration or change in the genes may hasten the process of memory loss and affect the thinking ability in people who are already at the risk…

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Regular Meditation May Reduce Risk of Memory Loss in Elderly

A new study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, shows that older adults who practice meditation regularly may have improved memory functions and better objective cognitive performance  than those who don’t. Moreover, these two functions are also key risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is a type of dementia that destroys your memory and also affects your thinking and behavioral skills. Researchers from West Virginia University in the United States found out that in older adults with subjective cognitive decline, a condition that may represent a preclinical stage of Alzheimer’s disease, practicing…

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Exercise May Boost Memory, Brain Activity in Elderly

To increase brain function and boost memory in older adults, it is important to maintain high levels of fitness through physical activity such as walking, jogging, swimming, or dancing. Brain function and memory are the hallmark impairments in Alzheimer’s disease. According to this study, the age-related changes in memory performance and brain activity largely depend on an individual’s fitness level. Older adults who exercised showed good cardiac fitness levels which improved their memory performance and increased brain activity patterns compared to their low fit peers. “Therefore, starting an exercise programme,…

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An Hour-Long Nap May Boost Memory, Thinking In Elderly

An hour-long nap after lunch may help older adults to preserve their memories, improve their ability to think clearly as well as to make decisions, a study has found. Sleep plays a key role in helping older adults maintain their healthy mental function, necessary for people as they age, the researchers said. In the study, led by Junxin Li from the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, the team examined nearly 3,000 Chinese adults aged 65 and older to learn whether taking an afternoon nap had any effect on their mental health….

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Want to be smarter and have a better memory? Eat foods rich in this

According to a study by the University of Illinois, eating foods rich in lutein – like many leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables for example – will help promote a healthy aging brain. (Lutein is a plant pigment humans consume through diet. It’s called a carotenoid vitamin and has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, Mayo Clinic says.) “Previous studies have found that a person’s lutein status is linked to cognitive performance across the lifespan,” says Marta Zamroziewicz, lead author of the study. “Research also shows that lutein accumulates in the grey matter of…

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Aerobic Exercises May Help Slow Down Memory Loss in Elderly

Regular aerobic exercise may be beneficial for older adults,who have been suffering from memory and thinking problems, says new research. Aerobic exercise (also known as cardio) is a physical exercise of low to high intensity that depends primarily on the aerobic energy-generating process. The study done by researchers at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, showed that people who exercised had a small improvement on the test of overall thinking skills compared to those who did not exercise. In addition to that, those who exercised also showed improvement…

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