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All in the hands: Finger length may predict athletic ability

Your hands may predict how good you are at sports, say scientists who found that athletic prowess could be related to the length of your fingers. Researchers explored the difference in length between one’s index finger and ring finger, and a possible link to muscular strength. They found that the ratio of the length of the index finger and the length of the ring finger – called the ‘digit ratio’ – is favourably related to muscular strength in boys. The ring finger in males is typically longer than the index…

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Brain Scans Can Predict a Baby’s Future Risk of Anxiety and Depression

Not too long ago mental diseases were not really spoken about openly. If anyone was undergoing any treatment, it was all hushed about and done behind closed doors. Now, with more and more people and celebrities voicing their opinions and sharing their experiences on social platforms, those affected are learning to open up rather than ignoring the issue at hand and suffering alone. The kind of lifestyles we lead today, stress is almost inevitable. And stress is what gives rise to many other health issues, as we start ignoring our…

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The Brain’s Need for Glucose: Low Levels Could Predict Alzheimer’s Risk

People often confuse sugar with calories but they are very different. Sugar is a glucose compound which is broken down by the process of metabolism, into simpler molecules with the release of energy. Sugar, a form of glucose is necessary for sustaining life in a living organism. Any living organism or tissue or even a cell eventually dies when the sugar level depreciates. This glucose compound helps in manufacturing energy to perform essential biological processes. Such biological processes taking place inside a living organization leads to the sustaining of respective…

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Brain Activity May Predict Risk of Falls in Elderly

Measuring the level of brain activity in healthy older adults while they are walking can predict their risk of falling, suggests a study led by an Indian-origin scientist. Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older adults and all too often lead to physical decline and loss of independence. “Previous studies have shown that when older people perform cognitively demanding tasks, their brains are required to become more active to handle the challenge,” said lead author Joe Verghese, Director at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in…

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Traditional cholesterol testing may not predict heart disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a condition which affects the arteries that supply the heart with blood. Traditional testing for the level of a specific component of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) — the “good cholesterol” — may not be a better predictor of the damage or disease in the heart’s major blood vessels, says a study. Failure of drug trials to observe benefits by elevating high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the blood has raised serious doubts about HDL-C’s properties of reducing the formation of plaques that block our blood vessels…

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Vitamin D Deficiency Can Predict Surprising Facts About Your Dental Health

Researchers have found that vitamin D deficiency caused majorly by lack of exposure to sun may reside in the teeth of every human being and remain viable for hundreds of years or more. The findings showed that the teeth can act as an essential fossil and help anthropologists to sneak into the lives and challenges of people who lived hundreds of years ago and whose only record is their skeletal remains. When the body is deprived of vitamin D, permanent microscopic abnormalities form in the layers of dentin — the…

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