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WHO Study Indicate Hike in Depression Cases By 20 Per Cent: 6 Habits We Need to Stop Today

The rise in depression cases has become an alarming concern across the globe, especially in the last decade or so, where we see umpteen young adults, college students and adults falling prey to the mental illness. Another startling report published by World Health Organisation (WHO) earlier this year, has taken the entire global mental health circuit by shock. “These new figures are a wake-up call for all countries to re-think their approach to mental health and to treat it with the urgency that it deserves,” said WHO Director-General, Dr Margaret…

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Weight Loss Surgery May Cut Diabetes Risks, Says Study

Weight loss surgery, also called bariatric surgery, is used to treat people who are dangerously obese. Leaving the fact that it is for people who are extremely obese, other people are also using the bariatric surgery to get in the desired shape. There are many types of weight loss surgery available depending on the amount of fat percentage you want to surgically remove from the body and their effects on your body. While many of us are afraid to let the needle surgically remove all the excess body fat, bariatric…

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A Super-Early Dinner Can Burn More Fat, Study Finds

Eating all your meals within a six-hour window sounds like some sort of fad diet (and a recipe for midnight fridge raids). But new research study suggests that having your dinner before 2 p.m.(!)—or skipping it entirely—actually reduces hunger cravings and boosts fat burn. Before you sign on for the super early–bird special, however, here’s what you should know. The study’s preliminary results (not yet published in an academic journal) were presented this week at the Obesity Society’s annual meeting. It’s the first human trial of “early time-restricted feeding,” a strategy in which…

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Protein can cut progression of both inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer: Study

A new study finds that altering the shape of a protein can significantly reduce the progression of inflammatory bowel disease and colon cancer. According to researchers, modifying the shape of IRAK-M, a protein that controls inflammation, can significantly reduce the clinical progression of both diseases in pre-clinical animal models. The findings appeared in the eBioMedicine journal. “When we tested mice with the altered IRAK-M protein, they had less inflammation overall and remarkably less cancer,” said Coy Allen from the Virginia-Maryland College of Veterinary Medicine. The next step, he said, will…

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Overdone fries, toast can cause cancer: Study

Potatoes and bread cooked at high temperatures for a long time could increase the risk of cancer in people who eat them regularly, British government scientists said on Monday. Toast, roast potatoes and chips, are all traditional staples of the British diet. The UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) said a substance called acrylamide, produced when starchy foods are roasted, fried or grilled for too long at high temperatures, has been found in animal studies to increase the risk of cancer. In a statement that drew criticism from some independent experts,…

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60% women unaware about age to begin heart screenings: Study

Sixty per cent of women in US think of heart screenings as necessary only after age 40, whereas health experts recommend that screenings should begin in the 20s, a study has found. According to the American Heart Associationrecommendations, screenings should start at 20, as the age may cause the onset of various heart-related disease. “Women cannot wait until they’re 40 to start paying attention to their risk factors. They can begin developing atherosclerosis, plaque in their arteries, in their teenage and early twenties,” Carolina Demori, cardiologist at the Orlando Health…

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