You are here

This Antibiotic Drug May Disrupt the Formation of Fears and Negative Thoughts

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder surfaces in people who have had experienced a traumatic, shocking event. Trauma triggers a host of changes in human body. Fear, when coupled with trauma can lead to a difficulty in dealing with the initial symptoms of stress. Those who take longer to get over the event – and continue to feel threatened, panicky or fearsome even after considerable time – can be diagnosed with PTSD. The symptoms and intensity of people with PTSD range from person to person. “Not every traumatized person develops ongoing (chronic) or…

Read More

Heavy Drinking During Youth Can Disrupt Brain Development

Excessive alcohol use during adolescence can disrupt the development of brain and increase risk of substance use disorder later in life, a study says. “The maturation of the brain is still ongoing in adolescence, and especially the frontal areas and the cingulate cortex develop until the twenties. Our findings strongly indicate that heavy alcohol use may disrupt this maturation process,” said first author of the study Noora Heikkinen from University of Eastern Finland. Cingulate cortex has an important role in impulse control, and volumetric changes in this area may play…

Read More

lengthy-term use of antibiotics ought to disrupt brain feature

remedies concerning lengthy-time period use of antibiotics have the potential to disrupt mind features , suggests a new research which observed that healthy gut bacteria is important to retaining the thoughts sharp. A special kind of immune mobile serves as an middleman between intestine micro organism and the brain, showed the findings that could also assist to alleviate the signs of intellectual disorders. The gut and the brain “communicate” to one another through hormones, metabolic products or direct neural connections. in this take a look at, the researchers switched off…

Read More

Depression May Disrupt the Brain’s Emotion Processing Network

  Regions of the brain that normally work together to process emotion become decoupled in people who experience multiple episodes of depression, a study has found. The findings would help identify which patient would benefit from long term anti-depressant treatment to prevent the recurrence of depressive episodes. “Half of the people who have a first depressive episode will go on to have another within two years,” said study co-author, Scott Langenecker. Disruptions in the network of areas of the brain that are simultaneously active during problem-solving and emotional processing have…

Read More