You are here

This anti-clot drug could reduce stroke risk too

A drug to treat bleeding may benefit some stroke patients as well, according to a study. The research, led by experts at The University of Nottingham, found that giving tranexamic acid (TXA) to people who had experienced intracerebral haemorrhage reduced the number of deaths in the early days following the stroke. It also found that both the amount of bleeding in the brain and number of associated serious complications were lower in the patients who had received the TXA treatment. However, the trial found no difference in the number of…

Read More

This widely used pesticide is messing up your hormones

The most widely used pesticides in the world may disrupt our hormones and adversely affect human health, a study has found. Neonicotinoids frequently make headlines because of their harmful effects on honeybees and other insect pollinators. Neonicotinoids act on insects’ nervous systems, killing them by paralysis. Very little research has been done on their effects on human health. The study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, shows that they may also have an impact on human health by disrupting our hormonal systems. “Endocrine disrupters are natural or synthetic molecules that…

Read More

This method can ensure higher rates of cure for hepatitis C infection

Mass treatment of a population with chronic hepatitis C infection has produced high rates of cure, according to a study. The research, conducted in Punjab, evaluated the feasibility of decentralised care and the provision of free direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) among a population of almost 20,000 individuals. It validated the efficacy and safety of generic all-oral DAA regimens delivered using a decentralised algorithm-based public health model. “We have shown in our study that it is possible to cure more than 90% of individuals with HCV infection in a highly dispersed…

Read More

Ladies, this new tool can protect you from HIV transmission

A new tool has been developed to protect women from HIV infection. The tool, developed by the scientists at the University of Waterloo, is a vaginal implant, which decreases the number of cells that the HIV virus can target in a woman’s genital tract. Unlike conventional methods of HIV prevention, such as condoms or anti-HIV drugs, the implant takes advantage of some people’s natural immunity to the virus. HIV infects the body by corrupting T cells, that are mobilised by the immune system when the virus enters a person’s body….

Read More

This is the one thing that could make exercise a bit more enjoyable

Exercise is like marmite: some people love it, while others hate it. But if you fall into the latter category, fear not – scientists reckon they’ve found a way to make your time spent in the gym more enjoyable, and it’s pretty simple. Researchers at Brunel University in London have revealed that listening to musicwhile you’re working out could make things more enjoyable. This might seem a bit obvious. After all, it’s no secret that music can elicit an emotional response from the listener – making us feel happy, sad, angry or even…

Read More

This is what you should eat for a good night’s sleep

If you struggle to get to sleep of a night, then fear not, because help is at hand. Alongside the age-old advice of avoiding your phone, taking a bath, reading a book or spraying lavender on your pillow, comes new rules on what you should eat before bedtime. Sleep expert Sammy Margo, author of The Good Sleep Guide, told the Mail Online that certain foods hold the power to help us sleep better, while eating the wrong ones, can actually be detrimental to our sleep cycle. Margo has identified five foods that we should be…

Read More