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Drinking baking soda may help combat rheumatoid arthritis

Drinking baking soda daily may help reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, say scientists. While the immune system normally protects us from disease and infection, in someone who has an autoimmune disease the immune system attacks healthy cells in the body by mistake. Drinking baking soda, or sodium bicarbonate, tells the spleen — which is part of the immune system — to go easy on the immune response, the study said. “Certainly drinking bicarbonate affects the spleen and we think it’s through the mesothelial cells,” said…

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Anxiety and aggression in young boys may increase due to low iron levels

Iron deficiency and low blood levels of Vitamin B12 in small boys may be associated with behaviour problems, such as anxiety and aggression, when they get in middle school, according to a new study. The findings showed that iron deficiency, anaemia and low plasma vitamin B12 levels in boys at around age 8 were associated with 10% higher mean scores on externalising behaviours such as aggression and breaking of rules. Iron deficiency was related to an adjusted 12% higher mean on internalising problem scores like anxiety and depression. “Some parts…

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Dear parents, take note. Pre-schoolers with ADHD symptoms may have reduced brain size

Pre-schoolers with symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) may have reduced brain volumes in regions essential for behavioural control, says a new study. ADHD is the most commonly diagnosed form of psychopathology during the pre-school years, and during early childhood it is associated with significant long-term health. The study represents the first comprehensive examination of cortical brain volume in pre-school children with ADHD and provides an indication that anomalous brain structure is evident in the early stages of development. According to the researchers, the findings can help in determining new ways…

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What Is A Cheat Meal? Why An Occasional Binge May Not Be A Bad Idea

So, you have been good all the week. Refrained from fried foods, chose to pick a salad over the fatty steak. And, let’s not forget the cheesecake cravings that you successfully managed to ignore! When it comes to food, not giving into the impulses is a task. A task, that calls for a due reward from time to time. Cheat meal is one such incentive you can treat yourself with, after a spell of eating clean and staying active. Don’t worry; your nutritionists would not mind this occasional binge either. But Why…

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Dear parents, take note. Bariatric surgery may halve heart disease risk in obese teens

Bariatric surgery can cut in half the risk of premature heart disease and stroke in teenagers with severe obesity, a study has found. The study, based on a prediction model, showed that prior to bariatric surgery the overall risk of a severely obese teen having a fatal or non-fatal heart attack, stroke, heart failure or other heart disease event over a 30-year period was 8 per cent on average. One year after surgery, the risk of a heart disease event would be cut in half — to 4 per cent…

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Diabetics may get help in improving blood sugar levels from this telehealth program

Turns out, improving blood sugar control in type 2 diabetes patients is as easy as using a telehealth program. A study conducted in veterans found that the program for diabetes self-management not only shortens the wait to talk to a physician specialist versus an in-person visit but also results in patients with type 2 diabetes having comparable improvements in blood glucose (sugar) control to patients receiving traditional care finds. The “telediabetes” program at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Pittsburgh Healthcare System, where the study took place, merges an electronic consultation, or…

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