Draft National Education Policy-2019 | A Vision Document for new India

Government of India has come up with the draft of National Education Policy-2019 for inputs and very soon the policy may be out in its final shape. The draft was submitted to MHRD by Kasturirangan Committee constituted in 2017. This draft policy is formulated in an inclusive, participatory and holistic manner to meet the changing dynamics of the needs and aspirations of new India. The draft policy is developed on five foundational pillars of access, equity, quality, affordability and accountability. It also promotes innovations and research, aiming to make India…

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Viewpoint | Play your investment with cricket lessons

May 2019 was an action packed month for India as two of India’s three biggest obsessions (Politics, Cricket and Bollywood) kept everyone hooked to their television sets and smart phones for latest updates and live action. While the election campaign and results kept everyone interested during the first half of the month, the Cricket World Cup which commenced exactly a week after the Lok Sabha Election Results did grab a lot of eyeballs over this month. ICC Cricket World Cup—Cricket’s quadrennial 50-over event—is the most coveted prize in the world…

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Podcast | Digging Deeper – India’s surge on World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Index

So you’ve heard the news, I assume. As the central government finds itself caught in a battle of wills with the RBI, this news should provide some cheer for the folks in the upper echelons of the administration. India has once more jumped a few places in the “ease of doing business” rankings. 23 places to be precise, so more than just a few. Besides the catchy name, what’s great about that list is that it acts as a fairly reliable weathervane for judging the business climate in any economy. The World…

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The NSW Department of Education commissioned a $300,000 scripture review, but rejects its major findings | poll

THE NSW Department of Education has rejected major recommendations of a $300,000 taxpayer-funded review of scripture in NSW schools, including the need for more information on scripture providers to “identify radical groups or cults”. The 238-page review, completed in 2015 but not released until Tuesday, found scripture providers did not “consistently produce good quality curricula from an educational perspective”, the system of authorising scripture providers lacked transparency, and some scripture teachers were using authorised, but age-inappropriate materials, while others used non-authorised materials. The review found the Department of Education and scripture providers…

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