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1 in 25 Children In England Have Been Classified As ‘Severely Obese’

In England, obesity rates have risen among children and it is concerning health officials. Children between the ages of 10-11 years old have been classified as severely overweight. Defining Childhood Obesity According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, childhood obesity is measured by using the body mass index (BMI) tool. BMI is determined by dividing a person’s weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters. For children and teenagers, the BMI is age and gender specific. When deducing a child’s BMI, their weight status is determined by using age and…

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Asthma in children could become worse if you live near a busy road

Asthma attacks in children, who live near a busy, major roadway or a playground, is often severe, suggests a new study. Long-time exposure to traffic-related pollution and dust has been linked to asthma in children. According to a research conducted by the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, children living within a football field’s length of major roadways had nearly three times the odds of paediatric asthma compared to children who lived four times farther away. It has been long known that smog and pollution can bring on an asthma attack…

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Dear parents, take note. Children who snore are likelier to grow up into obese adults

If your child snores, don’t ignore it. It could lead to some serious health trouble later in life. A team of researchers has shed some light on the vicious cycle of childhood obesity and snoring. Scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) looked at the relationships among maternal snoring, childhood snoring and children’s metabolic characteristics – including body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance, which reflects future risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease – in approximately 1,100 children followed from gestation through early adolescence. Led by endocrinologist Christos…

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How technology is helping Assam’s rural children learn better

Arifa, Afreen, and Shabana, class VIII students of Milan HS School in Banekutchi of Nalbari district, tied a plastic cover over a leaf of a small plant. The next day, observing the water droplets that had formed inside the cover, they learnt about the process of photosynthesis. Back in their classrooms, they found out from the internet how aquatic and desert plants survive and then prepared a multimedia presentation on photosynthesis of different types of plants. Kaveri Borthakur, their science teacher, says that project-based learning using technology has improved students’…

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Dear parents, take note. Cholera vaccines are less effective for children under 5

Vaccines are helping India wipe out several diseases. When it comes to cholera though, things may be different. A study has found that cholera vaccines provide significantly less protection for children under the age five, a population particularly at risk of dying from the diarrhoeal disease. A team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University in the US conducted a review of literature, which considered seven clinical trials and six observational studies. They found that the standard two-dose vaccine regimen reduced the risk of getting cholera on average by 58% for adults but only…

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Why children of older fathers are smarter, more successful

Sons of older fathers are more intelligent, more focused on their interests and less concerned about fitting in, characteristics typically seen in “geeks’”, says a new study. While previous research has shown that children of older fathers are at a higher risk of some adverse outcomes, including autism and schizophrenia, the study published recently in Translational Psychiatry suggests that children of older fathers may also have certain advantages over their peers in educational and career settings. The researchers from King’s College London and The Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at the Icahn School of Medicine…

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