You are here

New blood test could predict second heart attack risk

A blood test that quickly and easily detects whether a person is at the risk of a secondary heart attack is being developed by scientists. The researchers at the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute in Australia have identified plasma lipid biomarkers (fats in the blood) that improve upon traditional risk factors in predicting heart disease and stroke. The blood test is proposed to be trialled in Australia over the next 2-3 years, said Peter Meikle, a professor Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute. Eventually this test will help better assess a…

Read More

How Trump Nominee Brett Kavanaugh Could Threaten Undocumented Children’s Education

Getty Images Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos has stoked public outrage more consistently than any other member of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet, a group not principally known for evading indignation. But perhaps DeVos’s most alarming error to date has received insufficient public attention. This disregard is regrettable because her blunder illuminates one of the U.S. Supreme Court’s most momentous opinions — and exposes a mounting threat to the decision. As last school year drew to a close, Congressman Adrian Espaillat of New York asked DeVos in a committee hearing whether public educators…

Read More

Chronotherapy Could Make Cancer Treatments More Effective, Here’s How

Chi Van Dang generally declines to discuss the science that made him famous. A leading authority on cancer metabolism, he routinely is asked to speak about how tumors reprogram biochemical pathways to help them slurp up nutrients and how disrupting these noxious adaptations could be a powerful approach to treating cancer. Instead of doing so, Dang uses his soapbox at every research meeting, lecture and blue-ribbon panel to advocate for something else: a simple yet radical tweak to how oncologists administer cancer drugs. The approach, known as chronotherapy, involves timing…

Read More

Do You Schedule Your Free Time? Don’t! Study Suggests It Could Make You Unhappy

Your social calendar might be sucking the joy out of activities that are supposed to be fun or relaxing, according to an upcoming paper co-written by a professor who studies time management. The paper argues that when a leisure activity is planned rather than spontaneous, we enjoy it less. That’s because we tend to mentally lump all our scheduled activities in the same bucket – whether it’s a dentist appointment or grabbing coffee with a friend. And that makes the pleasurable activities more of a chore. “It becomes a part…

Read More

Testosterone therapy could be the cure for drastic weight loss in cancer patients

Testosterone therapy can help prevent weight loss or loss of body mass in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, and help improve their quality of life. Many cancer patients suffer from a loss of body mass known as cachexia. Approximately 20% of cancer-related deaths are attributed to the syndrome of cachexia, which in cancer patients is often characterised by a rapid or severe loss of fat and skeletal muscle. Melinda Sheffield-Moore, a professor at University of Texas in the US, showed that the hormone testosterone is effective at combatting cachexia in cancer patients. There are currently no established…

Read More

Gut microbes could lead to depression in obesity

Turns out, gut microbes may contribute to depression and anxiety in obesity. Researchers at Joslin Diabetes Center studied mice that become obese when put on a high-fat diet. The Joslin scientists found that mice on a high-fat diet showed significantly more signs of anxiety, depression and obsessive behaviour than animals on standard diets. “As endocrinologists, we often hear people say that they feel differently when they’ve eaten different foods,” said C. Ronald Kahn, M.D., co-Head of the Section on Integrative Physiology and Metabolism at Joslin. His lab has long studied…

Read More