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Fake tanning products don’t protect you from skin cancer

Sunless tanning or fake tanning products like sprays, ointments, creams, foams, or lotions that promise tan skin without increased risk of skin cancer do not actually help prevent cancer. A new study conducted by the researchers of the University of Minnesota Medical School sought to assess the demographic characteristics and skin cancer risk behaviours of adult sunless tanners. Other factors associated with sunless tanning included having a family history of skin cancer. Adults who used sunless tanning products were more likely to use indoor tanning beds and were less likely to wear protective…

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Uganda opens first investment window for tourism businesses to protect biodiversity and boost economy

Uganda yesterday launched the first investment window to seek to harness the financial muscle of the world’s leading hotel and lodge operators to raise vital funds to support and protect Uganda’s wildlife. The offering, which is being facilitated by the conservation charity Space for Giants and its partner the African Wildlife Foundationunder the Giants Club initiative, involves some of the most important wildernesses in the county. Uganda has Africa’s fastest growing elephant population but, with urgent development needs and limited budgets, the country lacks adequate financial resources to fully support its conservation requirements….

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Obesity can cause cancer. Aspirin pills can protect you from it

Aspirin, a medication used to treat pain, fever or inflammation, could significantly reduce the effects of obesity on cancer, suggests a study on mice. Obesity is a known risk factor for certain types of cancer, including colon, pancreatic and breast cancer. Previous research, too, showed that aspirin could reduce risk of cancer in the digestive tract, though it also caused side effects like gastrointestinal bleeding. The new study, from Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, showed that obesity could enhance cancer development by slowing down the key cancer defence mechanism. “Epithelial”…

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Obesity can cause cancer. Aspirin pills can protect you from it

Aspirin, a medication used to treat pain, fever or inflammation, could significantly reduce the effects of obesity on cancer, suggests a study on mice. Obesity is a known risk factor for certain types of cancer, including colon, pancreatic and breast cancer. Previous research, too, showed that aspirin could reduce risk of cancer in the digestive tract, though it also caused side effects like gastrointestinal bleeding. The new study, from Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, showed that obesity could enhance cancer development by slowing down the key cancer defence mechanism. “Epithelial” cells lining the surfaces…

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Ladies, this new tool can protect you from HIV transmission

A new tool has been developed to protect women from HIV infection. The tool, developed by the scientists at the University of Waterloo, is a vaginal implant, which decreases the number of cells that the HIV virus can target in a woman’s genital tract. Unlike conventional methods of HIV prevention, such as condoms or anti-HIV drugs, the implant takes advantage of some people’s natural immunity to the virus. HIV infects the body by corrupting T cells, that are mobilised by the immune system when the virus enters a person’s body….

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Ladies, take note: Eating broccoli and cabbage can protect you from heart disease

Eating cruciferous vegetables including broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and sprouts three or more times per day can prevent hardening of neck arteries in elderly women and also decrease the risk of heart diseases, a study has found. Researchers observed a 0.05 millimetre lower carotid artery wall thickness between high and low intakes of total vegetables. “That is likely significant, because a 0.1 millimetre decrease in carotid wall thickness is associated with a 10% to 18% decrease in risk of stroke and heart attack,” said lead author Lauren Blekkenhorst, from the University…

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